Tag Archives: hypothetical situations

Does the Powerball Qualify as a “Lotto” Money?

Today I drove a car for the first time since summer 2010.

Also, since today was Friday the 13th, my mom and I went to Safeway to buy lotto tickets, as neither of us was feeling particularly unlucky and hey—slight possibility for big bucks. On the way home, we theorized what we’d do with $66 million (that’s what the Powerball is up to as of tonight, I think).

Here’s what I’d do with $66 million:

  • Pay my parents back for all their monetary help over the past year (moving to/back from London, plus various other expenses).
  • Provide each of my good friends with a substantial sum of money with which they can do what they wish.
  • Go back to school! Forever! I’d get all the undergraduate degrees I could, then write about them in a book I’d call Degrees of Freedom. Because I’m awesome like that.
  • Donate to The Humane Society. Or adopt a metric crap ton of cats and just live on a giant cat farm.
  • Give my mom a large enough amount of money so that she could retire.
  • Start a foundation/program to help with homelessness, as described in this blog.
  • Get a car. Preferably of this variety.
  • Acquire tons of clay, tons of clay tools, a pottery wheel, a kiln, and a bunch of glaze. Sculpt to my heart’s content.
  • Get a new iPod, haha.
  • Get a ticket to Burning Man.
  • Donate to the Vandal Marching Band.
  • Donate to the Moscow High School Band.

Probably a bunch of other stuff, too. $66 million is a LOT of money.

What would you do with it?

I’m getting rather tired of your language, Mr. Asterisk.

So it occurred to me today that I never posted what I would pick on those little choice thingies I gave you guys on the fourth. So here are my answers (plus short justifications. I say “short” because you all know me, I could go on for reams).

Choice set 1
Option A: You are shown your future at a certain point in time (say, at age 40), and you have no way of changing it no matter what choices you make.
Option B: You are shown the same point in your future and you are given no hints as you how you got there.

After much deliberation, I choose option A on this one. I personally think that it would be worse to see a point in your future and have no hints as to how you got there then to see the same point and no that, no matter what you do, you will get to that point. Heck, if it’s a good point, then if you choose option A, you can do whatever you want in life until that point in time and still get to that point. If the point in time is good and you choose option B, you will be deliberating with yourself over every single choice you make in life, wondering which option will get you to that point. Wouldn’t that suck?

Choice set 2
Option A: You will never be able to trust anyone again.
Option B: You will never be able to be trusted again.

Option A, easily. I don’t really need much of an explanation for this, I think. I know I’m trustworthy. I don’t believe much that other people are. I can trust myself, and therefore I would rather have other people be able to trust me as well.

Choice set 3
Option A: Be completely left in the dark when it comes to others’ opinions about you (they can’t tell you, etc.)
Option B: Know everything (both good and bad) everyone’s ever said about you behind your back.

Option B. I know for a fact that there have been a lot of bad things said about me behind my back, but I would much rather know everything (including the good and the bad) that people vocalize about me than not get any feedback at all. Where’s the fun in that? If you’re going to hate me, freaking tell me.

Choice set 4
Option A: Never have the capacity to love.
Option B: Never be able to be loved.

I choose option B. I would much rather love without it being reciprocated than to have someone chasing me around saying they love me with me all the while unable to feel the love back. With option B you can fantasize all you want, anyway.

There ya go!

Hypothetical questions of loooooooooooooove!

“A plethora of options! But you still have to choose.”
“Does that make them true options, then?”
“Of course it does!”
“But you’re given a set number of things from which you are to make your selection. Aren’t true options boundless and without constraint?”
“Perhaps. But then, don’t people have boundless options even when there is a constraint? I could give a person the options of “yes” and “no” and they can choose to go on a cruise instead. It doesn’t mean it will happen, it doesn’t mean they chose, but they still were able to exercise their freedom.”
“Shouldn’t we save this for a later discussion?”
“How do you mean?”
“I mean I think you should GET TO THE POINT OF THE BLOG!”

 

Here is a series of hypothetical questions for you all. I’ve provided sets of answers (choices, rather, since none of them answer anything, assuming there was something to answer in the first place, other than the direct question…agh, shut UP!) for you all to choose from. Have fun. And indulge me in your answers, if you like. Curiosity. Some, at least for me, are easier to answer than others. But that probably means I haven’t looked at them from all angles yet.

Option A: You are shown your future at a certain point in time (say, at age 40), and you have no way of changing it no matter what choices you make.
Option B: You are shown the same point in your future and you are given no hints as you how you got there.

Option A: You will never be able to trust anyone again.
Option B: You will never be able to be trusted again.

Option A: Be completely left in the dark when it comes to others’ opinions about you (they can’t tell you, etc.)
Option B: Know everything (both good and bad) everyone’s ever said about you behind your back.

Option A: Never have the capacity to love.
Option B: Never be able to be loved.

 

Bah. I had about three more, but I can’t remember them. I shall post them when they come back into my head. But with sufficient thought, I think these shall suffice for a while.

Wee.