Eulering


Heyyyyyyyyy, what’s up, fools?

So remember Project Euler, that site that has hundreds of programming challenge problems? Well, I haven’t had much time for it lately (blame school), but today I decided to log back in and see if there was a problem I could try. And I found one!

This is the problem:

Passcode derivation (Problem 79): A common security method used for online banking is to ask the user for three random characters from a passcode. For example, if the passcode was 531278, they may ask for the 2nd, 3rd, and 5th characters; the expected reply would be: 317.
The text file, keylog.txt, contains fifty successful login attempts.
Given that the three characters are always asked for in order, analyse the file so as to determine the shortest possible secret passcode of unknown length.

This is one that I was able to solve by hand pretty easily, but since it’s a coding challenge site, I figured I ought to give it a shot using R. It took me a bit to get my code just right (there was one particular thing I was trying to do and I couldn’t figure out how to do it in R, so I had to modify things a bit), but I finally got it right!

Anyway, I’m not going to share my code here (it’s discouraged to share solutions outside the problem forums, each of which can only be accessed once you’ve input the correct answer for a  given problem), but I thought that this was a super interesting and fun question to try. It’s easy to do by hand, but in my opinion a bit harder to do with code.

If you like this type of stuff, try it out!

Also, happy birthday, mom!

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