Dear Calculus II:


What right do you have to be so damn awesome?

L’Hopital’s rule* just made my day. It is the COOLEST FREAKING THING, man!

All of my readers who have had more advanced math are probably thinking “holy freaking crap, Claudia, shut UP with this fascination with all these things everybody else already knows,” to which I say, “NEVER! This stuff is beautiful and powerful and wondrous and gives me tinglies and should give you tinglies as well because IT ALL WORKS TOGETHER AND IT’S MIND-BLOWING HOW THE UNIVERSE FUNCTIONS SO SMOOTHLY WHEN THERE’S SO DAMN MUCH OF IT!

Also, how in the hell can anyone fall asleep in Discrete Math? Multinomial Theorem = one sexy mofo. But I still suck at permutations/combinations. You’d think with all the stats stuff that such things would be somewhat intuitive to me now, but no.

Okay, enough blogging. Gotta get back to CALC!

*Actually, the rule was most likely developed by Johann Bernoulli; he had tutored L’Hopital and L’Hopital published the rule in his own textbook in 1696 under his own name (though he noted his debt to Bernoulli in the preface). This ticked Bernoulli off and there are letters he sent to Leibniz in which he complained about L’Hopital publishing the rule without proper acknowledgement. Sigh. Calculus, man.

Edit: woah, L’Hopital died on my birthday in 1704 and Bernoulli died on my grandpa’s birthday in 1748. Freaky.

4 responses

  1. Calc and the things you can do with it are awesome, I just don’t like doing the work to actually do it. But I agree with you.

    Like

  2. mathematicallyconfused | Reply

    “NEVER! This stuff is beautiful and powerful and wondrous and gives me tinglies and should give you tinglies as well because IT ALL WORKS TOGETHER AND IT’S MIND-BLOWING HOW THE UNIVERSE FUNCTIONS SO SMOOTHLY WHEN THERE’S SO DAMN MUCH OF IT!”

    Yup. Exactly this. I’ve never understood how people can say math is boring and irrelevent when out whole world is essentially made of it–or at the very least, it’s the language that gets us to the “bottom of things” in our universe.

    Like

    1. I feel the same way about stats, too, now that I think about it. Whether we know it or not we use stats in some form or another every day, and it’s such a fascinating and useful discipline even just considering that alone. I think part of the problem (at least in my experience) is that we’re never taught the “practical” or “useful” side of such things…we’re really too focused on “this is a method for solving problems of type x” without the necessary “problems of type x are found in situations A, B, and C.” Too much method, not enough association with reality. But that’s just my experience.

      Like

  3. mathematicallyconfused | Reply

    *OUR whole world…

    Like

What sayest thou? Speak!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: